Levich Institute Seminar Announcement, 09/18/2007
Tuesday, 09/18/2007
2:00 PM
Steinman Hall, Room #312
(Chemical Engineering Conference Room)

Dr. James A. Trainham and Greg McCollum
PPG Industries

"Challenges and Opportunities for a Manufacturer of Engineered Surfaces"


ABSTRACT


PPG Industries has identified what it considers to be the major issues of the marketplace in the future. These "Grand Challenges" include energy efficiency, comfort and esthetics, environmental stewardship, and protection of assets and infrastructure. Examples of PPG efforts in each area will be outlined. These efforts include research in organic coatings, inorganic coatings, coatings that react to external stimulus (such as photochromic coatings) and anticorrosion coatings.

BRIEF ACADEMIC/EMPLOYMENT BACKGROUND:

James A. Trainham is vice president of science and technology for PPG Industries. Trainham joined PPG in 2005 from Invista, Inc., formerly DuPont Textiles and Interiors, where he was chief technology officer from 2002 until its divestiture from DuPont in 2004. After two years on the faculty at the University of South Carolina, Trainham joined DuPont as a research engineer in polymer products. His almost 25 years with DuPont included assignments in central research and development and in business units with responsibility for process and product technology. In 1987 Trainham led the development of HFC-134a, the ozone-safe replacement for Freon12. In 1992 he was appointed director of engineering research, and in 1996 global technology director for Dacron polyester fibers and intermediates. In 1999 Trainham assumed responsibility as global technology director, Lycra synthetic fibers and Terathane polyether glycols. He was then appointed global technology director, apparel and textile sciences, before the formation of DuPont Textiles and Interiors. Trainham earned bachelor and doctoral degrees in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was elected to The National Academy of Engineering in 1997 and received the Chemical Engineering Practice Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers in 2002. In 2004, he was chairperson for a National Research Council workshop report, "Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs (2005)."