Levich Institute Seminar Announcement, 04/21/2009
Tuesday, 04/21/2009
2:00 PM
Steinman Hall, Room #312
(Chemical Engineering Conference Room)

Dr. Joseph Calantoni
Naval Research Laboratory
Stennis Space Center, Mississippi

"Discrete Particle Model for Nearshore Sediment Transport "


ABSTRACT


Predicting the evolution of nearshore bathymetry from the shoreline, offshore to the point where waves begin breaking, is a difficult problem of significant importance, with economic, legal, engineering, scientific, and military implications for coastal environments. Despite the accessibility of the phenomena of interest, namely the motion of sand under waves on the beach, traditional approaches to modeling beach evolution are not robust mainly because of our failure to understand the fundamental interaction forces driving sediment transport. Using a discrete particle (or element) model (DPM), we perform computer simulations that describe the collective and individual motions of sediment grains immersed in fluid. The DPM attempts to emulate the physics of the sea floor, at the fluid-sediment interface, in shallow water under forcing from waves and currents. A brief description of the technique will be followed by model-theory comparisons, model-data comparisons, and some selected research applications.

BRIEF ACADEMIC/EMPLOYMENT BACKGROUND:

  • Ph.D. in Physics, North Carolina State University, 2002
  • August 2008 to present: Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
  • July 2004 to present: Research Physicist, Littoral Dynamics Team, Marine Geosciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS
  • November 2002 to July 2004: NRC Post-Doctoral Researcher, Littoral Dynamics Team, Marine Geosciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS
  • January 1998 to November 2002: Research Assistant, Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
  • August 1997 to December 1997: Teaching Assistant, Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
  • May 1997 to August 1997: Research Assistant, Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
  • May 1996 to May 1997: Teaching Assistant, Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS:

Research interests primarily focus on the simulation of the fluid-sediment boundary layer in the coastal ocean from sediment transport to acoustic propagation.