Levich Institute Seminar Announcement, 03/20/2007

Tuesday, 03/20/2007
2:00 PM
Steinman Hall, Room #312
(Chemical Engineering Conference Room)

Professor Peter Kofinas
University of Maryland
Department of Bioengineering

"Functional Polymer Nanostructures with Application in Biological Recognition and Energy Storage "


[This is a CCNY/Columbia NSF-IGERT Soft Materials seminar]

ABSTRACT


The synthesis processing and characterization of novel polymer-based nanostructured systems used in a variety of technological fields will be presented. Applications of this research range from virus purification and virus recognition, to flexible batteries and antennas. Present problems of interest include: the development of novel functional magnetodielectric polymer nanocomposites for RF devices; the design of flexible, nanostructured polymer electrolytes for small-scale energy storage systems; the design of molecularly imprinted polymers for recognition of specific viruses; the selective immobilization and binding of recombinant proteins and viruses on nanopatterned polymer surfaces.

BRIEF ACADEMIC/PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND

Dr. Kofinas received bachelors and masters degrees in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) , and a PhD in materials science and engineering from MIT in 1994 from the interdisciplinary Program of Polymer Science and Technology (PPST). He was then appointed as a post-doctoral research associate in the department of Chemical Engineering at MIT for 2 years before joining the faculty at the University of Maryland in September of 1996. Dr. Kofinas was promoted to the rank of Professor at the University of Maryland in 2006.

CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS

The main thrust of Professor Kofinas' research program aims in the synthesis characterization and development of novel polymer based nanostructured systems used in a variety of technological fields ranging from medicine to microelectronics. Emphasis is given on synthesizing well characterized polymer systems to help elucidate structure-property relationships. Present problems of interest include: the design of molecularly imprinted polymers for recognition of specific viruses ; the selective immobilization and binding of recombinant proteins and viruses on nanopatterned polymer surfaces; the development of flexible nanostructured small-scale energy storage systems; the investigation of novel functional magnetodielectric polymer nanocomposites for RF applications.